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At the high school level at Busan Foreign School, grades 9-12, all students are placed in a rigorous AP college preparatory program.Our current foundational core courses are in the Advanced Placement program in English, History, Economics, Chemistry, and Psychology. These courses are primarily for our upper-level students – grades 11 and 12.

Students are granted one graduation credit per year of either a core required or a year of an elective course. Students must successfully complete an array of required and elective courses equally 24 credits through 2016. From June of 2017 on, all BFS graduates must have completed 26 full year credits.

Families and students can refer to the Student Handbook for specific graduation requirements.

The course descriptions for the 2022-23 school year can be found here: 2022-23 SY Course Descriptions

The course schedule for the 2022-23 SY can be found here: 2022-23 SY Course schedule

2021 AP exam results

English Language Arts (ELA)

BFS offers ELA lessons adapted to each grade level and an “AP Language and Composition” course available from grade 10.

Grade 9 Introduction to Literature (Language Arts Credit)

This course focuses on expanding students’ understanding of literature by analyzing authors’ themes and biases. Students will have a foundation in several genres by the end of the year, including short stories, poetry, young adult fiction, mythology, plays, and non-fiction. Vocabulary and grammar are integrated in all units. Writing skills focus on organizing an essay and using evidence and rhetoric effectively to support a thesis.

Grade 10 U.S. Literature (Language Arts Credit)

In this course, we read literature written by US authors from diverse backgrounds, focusing on contemporary texts. We discuss how history has informed and influenced these works. Class activities include Socratic Seminars, close reading, presentations, research, essays, and creative writing. Connections to history class and the world we live in today are a focus. Mini lessons on grammar and vocabulary are taught throughout the year.

Grade 11 English/Language Arts-11 (Language Arts Credit)

This course will focus on speculative fiction and the anxieties of the past and the present. We will track these themes across a range of American and English texts from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, to work by Edgar Allen Poe, Ray Bradbury and George Orwell. Students write formal researched argument essays during the first semester, and participate all year in Socratic Seminars, group activities, and collaborative Literature Circles which will culminate in class presentations and co-written reviews.

Grade 12 Senior English: College Preparation Literature and Composition (Language Arts Credit) - MANDATORY FOR ALL SENIORS

This course will focus on writing the self, in anticipation of college and scholarship application essays. Our biggest task during the first quarter will be drafting personal statements through writing labs, collaborative workshops, and peer-editing. We will read the modern tragedy Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe and a play or novel of student choice as part of a World Lit Unit. During the spring semester, students will take part in Lit Circles, which will build their autonomy and creativity, and in the final quarter, they will complete a senior project of their choosing. The goal of this course is to awaken students to their potential as college students and citizens of the world. 

Grades 10,11,12 AP English Literature & Composition (Language Arts Credit; Elective Credit)

According to the College Board, “AP English Language and Composition is an introductory college-level composition course. Students cultivate their understanding of writing and rhetorical arguments through reading, analyzing, and writing texts as they explore topics like the rhetorical situation, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization, and style.” Texts will focus on English and American literature, like Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” Shakespeare’s “Macbeth,” and speeches, letters and essays by writers like Frederick Douglass, Virginia Woolf and Martin Luther King. As this is a college-level course, students are expected to read and annotate up to 100 pages Monday-Friday. They are expected to be comfortable writing an 5-paragraph essay in 40 minutes with few mechanical errors. Students who spend 60 minutes per night reading or studying for this course have the most success. These understandings are the only prerequisite. 

Grades 9,10,11,12 Creative Writing (Language Arts Credit; Elective Credit)

This is a hybrid course that combines a creative writing workshop with close reading of literary texts. We will practice the art of writing fiction and poetry through studying mentor texts. Students will take part in regular writing workshops to offer one another feedback on their choice of assignments. Using this approach students will read deeply, study, and discuss the elements and contrasting styles of fiction writers such as Chekhov, Hemingway, Fitzgerald and Wolff as well as poets such as Shakespeare, Hardy, Frost, Gluck, Dickinson, Cummings. Then they will try their own hand at writing scenes or stories that embody techniques used by these writers, and poems that employ comparable styles. Second semester will culminate in a student-created Lit Mag, where BFS art and writing will be published! Although this is not a course where students will be expected to write essays, it does require deep reading of mentor texts as well as peer work, and participation in discussion about all of these texts. To the extent possible, we will also enjoy author visits.

Grades 9,10,11,12 Film Studies (Language Arts Credit; Elective Credit)

In this course, we will explore how cultural, historical, and political contexts shape a film’s narrative. We will analyze the development and structure of each film, along with the impact of filming techniques on viewers. We will read and write texts in response to the films we view, discuss and critique regularly, and assess credibility and bias in all course texts (audio, visual, written). Expect to write film reviews, produce screenplays, and challenge one another’s thoughts as part of a learning community.

Mathematics

Busan Foreign School has many mathematics lessons available and open to our High School students:

Grade 7, 8, 9 Algebra I

In the beginning of the year, there will be a review of rates, proportions, and simplifying expressions while practicing algebraic reasoning. Then, students will extensively study the solving of linear equations and graphing. In the second semester, the study of linear equations is extended to graph and solve linear inequalities in one and two dimensions. Then, students will solve systems of linear equations and inequalities. The year will conclude with studying exponents and quadratics. Throughout the year, there will be focus on algebraic reasoning and generalizing relationships between variables. Students will actively investigate mathematics and work with peers to communicate their findings. Then, as a class, we will summarize the findings in a clear and concise method.

Grades 8, 9, 10 Geometry (Math Credit)

This course involves the student as a problem solver, one who can reason mathematically and who can communicate and make connections among various mathematical ideas, including the following: points, lines, planes and angles, parallel lines and planes, transformations and congruence, congruent triangles, similar polygons, right triangles, circles, areas of plane and solid figures, volume and surface area of solids, organizing proofs logically and using formulae to solve problems.

Grades 9, 10, 11 Algebra 2 (Math Credit)

In this course, students will be investigating Algebra as a tool for calculation and problem-solving. We’ll start with some review of Algebra I and Geometry and focus on quadratic functions and factoring, polynomial functions, rational exponents and functions, rational functions, data analysis and statistics, sequence and series, quadratic relations and conic sections. Students will start learning how to use a graphic calculator with activities and work on research projects for in-depth understanding.

Grades 9, 10, 11 Algebra 2 with Trigonometry (Math Credit)

In the first semester, we will start with an in-depth study of quadratic function properties, graphing quadratics in several forms, and factoring and solving quadratics. Then, we will explore exponents along with higher order polynomials, operations with polynomials, and their graphs. Next, we will study several other non-linear functions: polynomials with rational exponents, radical functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. A focus will be on understanding the shape of the graph and how that can be used to graph transformations of those functions. In the second half of the year, we explore equations of circles and ellipses. Then, there is an introduction of trigonometric functions, solving trigonometric equations, and the Law of Sines and Cosines. Finally, we will end the year with exploring patterns of sums and products with mathematical sequences and series.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Pre-Calculus (Math Credit)

In this course, the students will review and learn more depth in Trigonometric, Geometric, and Algebraic techniques and how to integrate them to prepare for the study of calculus and strengthen their conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems. In addition to working problems by hand, students will learn how to use technology such as TI 83/84/89. These standards take a functional point of view toward those topics. The most significant new concept is that of limits.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Advanced Pre-Calculus (Math Credit)

In the first semester, we will start with a review of graphs of parent functions and transformations of those graphs. There is a focus on knowing the shape of several different functions and using properties to transform those graphs. We will explore properties of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic function in more depth through investigations and connecting to prior topics. Then, a significant portion of time will be spent studying trigonometry: trigonometric functions, identities, solving equations and laws of sines/cosines. For the remainder of the year, we will study systems of equations and inequalities, and sequences, series, and probability before concluding with an introduction to limits to help prepare for AP Calculus.

Grades 11, 12 AP Calculus AB (Math Credit/Elective)

AP Calculus AB focuses on students’ understanding of calculus concepts and provides experience with methods and applications. Through the use of big ideas of calculus (e.g., modeling change, approximation and limits, and analysis of functions), the course becomes a cohesive whole, rather than a collection of unrelated topics. The course requires students to use definitions and theorems to build arguments and justify conclusions.

The courses feature a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Exploring connections among these representations builds understanding of how calculus applies limits to develop important ideas, definitions, formulas, and theorems. A sustained emphasis on clear communication of methods, reasoning, justifications, and conclusions is essential. Teachers and students should regularly use technology to reinforce relationships among functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.

AP Calculus AB is designed to be the equivalent of a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus.

Grades 11, 12 Calculus (Math Credit/Elective)

AP Calculus BC focuses on students’ understanding of calculus concepts and provides experience with methods and applications. Through the use of big ideas of calculus (e.g., modeling change, approximation and limits, and analysis of functions), the course becomes a cohesive whole, rather than a collection of unrelated topics. The course requires students to use definitions and theorems to build arguments and justify conclusions.

The courses feature a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Exploring connections among these representations builds understanding of how calculus applies limits to develop important ideas, definitions, formulas, and theorems. A sustained emphasis on clear communication of methods, reasoning, justifications, and conclusions is essential. Teachers and students should regularly use technology to reinforce relationships among functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.

AP Calculus BC is designed to be the equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses. AP Calculus BC applies the content and skills learned in AP Calculus AB to parametrically defined curves, polar curves, and vector-valued functions; develops additional integration techniques and applications; and introduces the topics of sequences and series. 

Grades 11-12 AP Calculus AB (Math Credit/Elective)

AP Calculus AB focuses on students’ understanding of calculus concepts and provides experience with methods and applications. Through the use of big ideas of calculus (e.g., modeling change, approximation and limits, and analysis of functions), the course becomes a cohesive whole, rather than a collection of unrelated topics. The course requires students to use definitions and theorems to build arguments and justify conclusions.

The courses feature a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Exploring connections among these representations builds understanding of how calculus applies limits to develop important ideas, definitions, formulas, and theorems. A sustained emphasis on clear communication of methods, reasoning, justifications, and conclusions is essential. Teachers and students should regularly use technology to reinforce relationships among functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.

AP Calculus AB is designed to be the equivalent of a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus.

 

Grades 11, 12 AP Calculus BC (Math Credit/Elective)

AP Calculus BC focuses on students’ understanding of calculus concepts and provides experience with methods and applications. Through the use of big ideas of calculus (e.g., modeling change, approximation and limits, and analysis of functions), the course becomes a cohesive whole, rather than a collection of unrelated topics. The course requires students to use definitions and theorems to build arguments and justify conclusions.

The courses feature a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Exploring connections among these representations builds understanding of how calculus applies limits to develop important ideas, definitions, formulas, and theorems. A sustained emphasis on clear communication of methods, reasoning, justifications, and conclusions is essential. Teachers and students should regularly use technology to reinforce relationships among functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.

AP Calculus BC is designed to be the equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses. AP Calculus BC applies the content and skills learned in AP Calculus AB to parametrically defined curves, polar curves, and vector-valued functions; develops additional integration techniques and applications; and introduces the topics of sequences and series.

Grades 10-12 AP Statistics (Math Credit/Elective)

The AP Statistics course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  There are four themes evident in the content, skills, and assessment in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, probability and simulation, and statistical inference.  Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.  This AP Statistics course is taught as an activity-based course in which students actively construct their own understanding of the concepts and techniques of statistics.

Many are the subjects available to BFS students in the Social Studies area, whether History or Psychology, students are sure to find a subject of interest.

Grade 9 Asian History (Social Studies Credit)

This course offers a detailed study of Asian history, geography, and cultures as it follows the social and political development of the Asian continent. Students will be able to describe the physical geography of Asian countries and how geography influences civilizations. They will become familiar with the major religions practiced and how these religions shaped the development of each country. They will examine and evaluate primary sources to learn how the past has influenced the development of Asian nations and states.. Students will be assessed through tests, quizzes, homework, and group and individual projects. 

Grade 10 U.S. History (Social Studies Credit)

This social studies course is aimed at developing an understanding of the history of the United States.  The course content takes you through a somewhat comprehensive journey through U.S. History with an emphasis on the most impactful periods in U.S. history. Students will learn about the institutions, individuals, groups, ideas, circumstances, and events (both good and bad) which shaped the U.S. into what it is today.  
Throughout the learning process, students will work to gain an understanding of key historical, political, geographical, and economic concepts that can be applied outside the context of U.S. history.  In addition to content, students will work to develop their academic reading, writing, research, presentation, and communication skills to better prepare them for future coursework. Students must complete reading assignments, notes, and participate in discussions in order to be successful. Assessment will take place through frequent quizzes, tests, and projects.

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Global Issues/MUN (Social Studies Credit/Elective)

The world has become much smaller in recent years as new technology increases the speed and flow of information from one part of the world to the next. In this course, students conduct inquiries into contemporary and emerging global issues. Students work to gain an understanding of how history, culture, politics, and economics play important roles in shaping many of the global issues of our time.  The course will also promote and enhance research, collaboration, and multimedia presentation skills which can transfer to future academic coursework.
Students will participate in the Model United Nations (MUN) competition through the South Korea Activities Conference (SKAC) and will have the opportunity to participate in a regional MUN competition.

Grades 10, 11, 12 AP World History: Modern (Social Studies Credit/Elective)

AP US History is an introductory college-level US history course, covering from c. 1491 CE to the present. Students will analyze historical sources and use them to develop historical arguments. We will explore such concepts as American and national identity; work, exchange; the influence of technology, geography and the environment on society over time; migration and settlement; politics and power; America’s role in the world; American and regional culture; and changing social structures.

Work will be challenging, with emphasis on reading historical sources, writing, and analysis.

Grades 10, 11, 12 AP Psychology (Social Studies Credit/Elective)

The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. This is a content and vocabulary intensive course. Grade 10 students must have approval from their English teacher before signing up for the class.

Grades 11,12 AP Microeconomics (Social Studies Credit/Elective)

AP Macroeconomics is a college-level course that introduces students to the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination. It also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts.

Grades 11, 12 Economics and Personal Finance (Social Studies Credit/Elective)

Students will learn the basics of business, from budgeting to understanding accounting principles in order to track income and expenses. Topics covered throughout this yearlong course will include; consumer borrowing, savings and investing, planning for retirement, impact of monetary policy on inflation, and the psychology of consumers’ financial decisions.  Through reading, discussion, challenges and projects students will gain an understanding of basic business practices as well as make practical application to their lives as consumers.
Students may find a passion for business through this class, and all students will leave with a better understanding of the financial impact of their choices and equipped to better manage their finances.

As students progress through High Schoo, a wider variety of science-related courses are available.

Grade 9 Biology (Science Credit)

Biology is the study of life and living organisms, including their structure, function, growth, evolution, distribution, and taxonomy.
The objectives of this course are to provide students with a general knowledge of biology and to prepare students for a general biology course in university. The course topics are: the science of biology, the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, photosynthesis, cellular respiration and fermentation, cell growth and division, introduction to genetics, DNA, RNA and protein synthesis, human heredity, genetic engineering, Darwin’s theory of evolution, evolution of populations, classification, history of life, viruses and prokaryotes, animal systems, animal behavior, digestive and excretory systems, nervous system, skeletal, muscular, and integumentary systems, circulatory and respiratory systems, endocrine and reproductive systems, and immune system and disease.

Grade 10 Chemistry (Science Credit)

Chemistry is the study of the composition, structure, properties, and change of matter. The objectives of this course are to provide students with a general knowledge of chemistry and to prepare students for a general chemistry course in university.
The course topics are: labs and calculations, matter and change, measurements and calculations, atoms: the building blocks of matter, arrangement of electrons in atoms, the periodic law, chemical bonding, chemical formulas and chemical compounds, chemical equations and reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, gases, solutions, ions in aqueous solutions and colligative properties, acids and bases, acid-base titration and pH, reaction energy, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Environmental Science (Science Credit)

Using skills and tools that scientists use, students in the Environmental Science course will study interactions and interdependencies that living beings, including humans, have with their environment.. Based on current issues and foundational knowledge of both Earth and Social Sciences, we will explore how societies use natural resources and, at times, create serious issues that need attention. Based on the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the course will use an applied science approach to focus on real-life challenges, industry, workforce, the future, and the betterment of humanity, in addition to investigating practical solutions to current environmental problems. Students will consider human interaction with environmental systems and identify and develop ways in which they can steward their surroundings and the planet. Be ready to debate the issues, create authentic projects that improve and protect our surroundings, and discover ways we can enhance the planet we have inherited from our ancestors and will pass down to our descendants.  Because this is a field science class, students will spend many class periods outdoors in all seasons.

Grades 11, 12 Physics (Science Credit)

Physics is the study of the motion of matter, energy, and forces. The objectives of this course are to provide students with a general knowledge of physics and to prepare students for a general physics course in university. The course topics are: calculations, the science of physics, motion in one dimension, two-dimensional motion and vectors, forces and the laws of motion, work and energy, momentum and collisions, circular motion and gravitation, fluid mechanics, heat, thermodynamics, vibration and waves, sound, light and reflection, refraction, electric forces and fields, circuits and circuit elements, magnetism, and additional content.

Grades 11, 12 AP Biology (Science Credit)

AP Biology is the study of life and living organisms, including their structure, function, growth, evolution, distribution, and taxonomy. The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge of a general biology course in university. The course topics are: labs, the chemistry of life, the cell, the cell II, genetics, genetics II, mechanisms of evolution, the evolutionary history of biological diversity / animal form and function, and ecology.

BFS offers electives in High School in the areas of Life Skills, Technology, Arts, and world languages.

AP CAPSTONE

Grades 10, 11, 12 AP Seminar (Elective Credit)

AP Seminar is the foundational course in the AP Capstone diploma that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational literacy, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

**A.P Seminar requires a summer assignment to be completed before the school year begins. Students must enroll in A.P Seminar before August 1st to have enough time to complete the summer assignment.

Grades  11,12 AP Research (Elective Credit)  

AP Research, the second course in the AP Capstone experience, allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest.  Students design, plan and implement a year-long investigation to address a research question.  Through this inquiry, they further the skills they acquired in the AP Seminar course by learning research methodology, employing ethical, employing ethical research practices, and accessing, and analyzing and synthesizing information.  Students reflect on their skill development, document their process, and curate the artifacts of their scholarly work through a process and reflection portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4,000-5,000 words (accompanied by a performance, exhibit, or product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Physical Education (PE) / Health (Full HS PE Credit)

Physical Education for HS students consists of individual sport-specific skill training with an emphasis on volleyball & basketball rules, skills, techniques, and strategies for competition. This course ties in well with our school’s SKAC league sports seasons in Semester 1. Additionally the course focuses on health-related physical fitness concepts based on the Fitness For Life program, which utilizes a textbook and supplemental online ancillary resources.

DIGITAL/TECHNOLOGY SKILLS

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Maker Space: Design and Engineering (Elective Credit)

This is a year-long and project-driven course devoted to solving problems and creativity. Students will analyze problems, create solutions, and test their designs. They will learn to use a variety of materials from paper-craft, traditional wood construction, Lego robotics, and 3D printing as well as others to solve tasks. These tasks will be a combination of practical problems to be solved for the benefit of BFS, problems posed by the teacher (solving problems that will help individuals and societies), and problems and designs that the students will come up with on their own. Activities will include identifying possible construction projects, determining materials needed, learning the safe and proper use of hand and power tools, working both independently and collaboratively, and the basic use of circuits and programming to accomplish tasks. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Intro to Computer Science (Digital Arts Credit/Elective)

This class focuses on building skills in computer science and teaches the fundamentals of computer programming as well as some advanced features of the Python language. Using a mix of CodeHS, Carnegie Mellon, and JumpStart Python, students will utilize a project-based approach to programming to solve problems logically and efficiently in both individual and collaborative programming settings.  This course does not assume any prior programming experience.  Students will learn the basics of programming, and then gradually harness the power of some of Python’s more advanced features to make games, solve real-world problems.  This course is a perfect primer for students who have a general interest in computer science and those who wish to take AP Computer Science courses alike.

Grades 10, 11, 12 AP Computer Science Principles (Digital Arts Credit/Elective)

AP Computer Science Principles is an introductory college-level computing course that introduces students to the breadth of the field of computer science. Students learn to design and evaluate solutions and to apply computer science to solve problems through the development of algorithms and programs. They incorporate abstraction into programs and use data to discover new knowledge. Students also explain how computing innovations and computing systems—including the internet—work, explore their potential impacts, and contribute to a computing culture that is collaborative and ethical.It is recommended that students have successfully completed high school algebra and have adequate descriptive writing skills before taking this course.

Grades 11, 12 AP Computer Science A (Digital Arts Credit/Elective)

AP Computer Science A is an introductory college-level computer science course. Students cultivate their understanding of coding through analyzing, writing, and testing code as they explore concepts like modularity, variables, and control structures. While there are no official prerequisites for this course, it is highly recommended that students have some prior programming experience.

ARTS

Grades 6 – 12 Studio Art (HS  Arts Credit/Elective)

These middle and high school classes are designed with the serious art student in mind. We will emphasize art as an ongoing process that involves you making informed and critical decisions while working in a number of different artistic realms: drawing, 2D, and 3D pieces. You will add to your technical artistic skills and become more aware of all aspects of visual artistic elements.
Students will create projects that range from the political to the personal and whimsical by using a variety of media – for example, a collage that makes a powerful visual statement about an important issue or a Picasso-like sculpture splashed with color and pattern.
A key focus is the language of art, known as the Elements and Principles of Design. Some key art movements are studied as well as the larger question: “What is Art?” Feedback and reflection are other important parts of the learning process, facilitated by our art teacher. This class will open students’ eyes to new ideas about art and creativity.

Grades 10 – 12 AP Drawing (Arts Credit/Elective)

The AP 2-D Art and Design course framework presents an inquiry-based approach to learning about and making art. Students are expected to conduct an in-depth, sustained investigation of materials, processes, and ideas. The framework focuses on concepts and skills emphasized within college art foundations courses with the same intent: to help students become inquisitive, thoughtful artists able to articulate information about their work. AP 2-D Art and Design students develop and apply skills of inquiry and investigation, practice, experimentation, revision, reflection and communication.

Students create a portfolio of work to demonstrate inquiry through art and development of materials, processes, and ideas over the course of a year. Portfolios include works of art process documentation, and written information about the work presented. In May, students submit portfolios for evaluation based on specific criteria, which include skillful synthesis of materials, processes, and ideas and sustained investigation through practice, revision and experimentation, guided by questions. Students may choose to submit any or all of the AP Portfolio Exams.

Grades 9 – 12 HS Choir (HS Arts Credit/Elective)

The high school Choir class is designed to develop and advance the musical, creative, and expressive abilities of students. Chorus students will use their vocal instrument to create a correct and pleasing singing sound.  In addition to advancing a proper vocal singing technique, students will also study music reading and listening skills, sight-singing skills, and performance etiquette. Students will advance their mastery of solfege, major and minor scales, and 3 and 4 part harmonies. Students will create and experience music as a musical ensemble. Students will develop an understanding and appreciation of music from different cultures and periods of time. Students will have the opportunity to develop team building and leadership skills as they prepare for school and regional performances. This is a performance-based class. Participation in concert performances outside of regular class hours is required.

Grades 6 – 12 Beginner Band (HS Arts Credit/Elective)

The high school Choir class is designed to develop and advance the musical, creative, and expressive abilities of students. Chorus students will use their vocal instrument to create a correct and pleasing singing sound.  In addition to advancing a proper vocal singing technique, students will also study music reading and listening skills, sight-singing skills, and performance etiquette. Students will advance their mastery of solfege, major and minor scales, and 3 and 4 part harmonies. Students will create and experience music as a musical ensemble. Students will develop an understanding and appreciation of music from different cultures and periods of time. Students will have the opportunity to develop team building and leadership skills as they prepare for school and regional performances. This is a performance-based class. Participation in concert performances outside of regular class hours is required.

Grades 7 – 12 Intermediate Concert Band (HS Arts Credit/Elective)

This is a course designed for students who have had the equivalent of one year of experience playing in a concert band.  If you have completed the Beginner Band class at BFS, this is the next step!  It is only for students who can play their instrument at an intermediate level.  We will play music at the Grade 1-2 Concert Band level.  Students should have a solid understanding of scales and keys, and be able to read music.   We will learn about the fundamentals of music and prepare musical selections for performance around Busan and at festivals throughout the year.  It is possible that there are instruments available from the school for rent if necessary.  Come out and play in a dynamic musical ensemble at BFS!  See Ms. Harris  if you are not sure if this is the right class for you.

Grades 7 – 12 Concert Band (HS Arts Credit/Elective)

Concert Band at BFS is a course designed for students who would enjoy playing in an advanced  wind ensemble setting.  Experience playing an instrument is necessary to be in this band.  Members must be able to play their instrument at an intermediate level and comfortably read music.  The reading level will start at Grade 2.5.  You must be comfortable playing in a variety of different keys.  This is the most advanced Band class at BFS.  We will continue to learn about the fundamentals of music and prepare musical selections for performance around Busan and at festivals throughout the year.  It is possible that there are instruments available from the school for rent if necessary.  Come out and play in a dynamic musical ensemble!  See Ms. Harris if you are not sure if this is the right class for you. As this course will be offered outside the regular timetable, HS students who complete a full year of the course will receive .5 fine art credit towards graduation.

Grades 10 – 12 Music History (Social Studies or Arts Credit/Elective)  

In this class, students will get a basic understanding of how music has evolved over the ages.  We will begin  with music from over 1000 years ago and follow its development through the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20th Century experiencing the music and exciting lives of the musical masters of the eras.  As we move through the historical development of music, we will also explore detail on how the language of music evolved, from Guido in the 11th Century teaching choral parts to people pointing at different parts of his hand for specific musical notes to the writings of 20th Century composers that are musically bizarre! This class will involve some analysis of musical compositions. A basic ability to read music would be a tremendous asset to have for success in this class.  See Ms. Harris if you have any questions.

Grades 10 – 12 Guitar (Arts Credit/Elective)

Who doesn’t want to play the guitar? Have you dreamt of singing while playing an instrument, or writing your own music?  In this course offering at BFS, you will have the opportunity to develop skills on guitar, vocals, song writing, or whatever you would like to discover in your musical soul!  This course works well for older students that want to try something new. 
This is a class that really lives up to “you get out of it what you put into it.”  Ms. Harris has been working with students in the past that have really discovered a love for making their own music.  Getting involved in this program could open up a musical journey that lasts a lifetime.  Come and give it a try. You can enroll in this class more than once.   BFS will have some acoustic guitars for use in class. No previous experience required, just a strong desire to learn something new!

WORLD LANGUAGES

Grade 9-12 HS Spanish 1 (Foreign Language Credit/Elective)

This first-year high school Spanish course will introduce students to the foundation of the language and help to develop their expressive confidence.
Through individual and collaborative activities, students will communicate about their family and friends, likes and dislikes, school, food, culture, and the world around them. Through songs, introductory novels, videos, and other authentic materials, students will be immersed in the Spanish language in order to build a strong base in the four skill areas of listening, reading, writing, and speaking.

Grade 9-12 HS Spanish 2 (Foreign Language Credit/Elective)

This course will build on skills learned in Spanish I, expand vocabulary, increase grammar proficiency, develop literacy skills, and give students the confidence to express themselves more fully in the Spanish language.
Spanish 2 will prepare students to communicate in various times and tenses through the exploration of topics such as the body, the home, shopping, and travel. Through songs, introductory novels, videos, and other authentic materials, students will be immersed in the Spanish language and related cultures in order to improve in the four skill areas of listening, reading, writing, and speaking.

Grade 10-12 HS Spanish 3 (Foreign Language Credit/Elective)

Spanish 3 will review and build on prior skills learned in Spanish I, and II, moving students closer to fluency. This level of Spanish instruction assumes a basic-intermediate knowledge of grammar concepts and vocabulary introduced in previous levels. Emphasis is on communicating in Spanish through reading, listening, writing, and speaking in various contexts and aspects of time. Students also study Hispano-American and Spanish cultures, geography, and history through literary texts, film, pop songs, and other authentic materials. Students will frequently participate in individual, paired, and group activities as well as complete written and oral projects to practice and apply new vocabulary and grammar concepts.  Students will read at least one novel each semester as well as explore social and cultural topics through literary texts and authentic readings.  Students will present on topics using composition and conversation while integrating advanced grammar. Oral and written proficiency will be evaluated frequently.

Grade 11-12   HS AP Spanish (Foreign Language Credit/Elective)

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is intended for the highly motivated and capable student. This class will allow the student to continue to build proficiency in the areas of reading, writing, listening, and speaking through a variety of interactive and non-interactive activities such as compositions, essays, oral presentation, skits, in-depth studies of Spanish and Latin American literature, history, and geography. The units cover a variety of societal and cultural issues that are important to our global community. The end desire of teaching these units is to nurture the students’ growth as they become Global Citizens, and help them make cultural connections when comparing their individual communities to those of the Spanish Speaking world. The 6 Thematic Units are Personal and Public Identity; Families and Communities; Science and Technology; Beauty and Aesthetics; Contemporary Life; and Global Challenges. Students may sign up for AP Spanish only with permission from the instructor.

Grades 9 – 12 Korean for Non-Native Speakers (Foreign Language Credit/Elective)

This course is combined with first-year and second- year Korean Class. This course is for non-native Korean speakers only and it is designed to communicate about daily life, to learn appropriate expressions in order to successfully handle uncomplicated communicative tasks such as ordering, requesting, recommending, reserving and so on. Through individual and collaborative activities, students will communicate and develop vocabulary, literacy, listening and speaking skills and will read and write simple notices, e-mail, and daily life-based articles which are related to ordinary life and culture to broaden their understanding of Korean society.

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